Green Initiatives

Tree Lifecycle
01
Young Trees
Everything we do to a young tree has a bearing on what it will be like as a mature tree. Over time, with continued nurturing a seedling grows into a young tree. Young trees are called saplings and are either self-sown naturally or planted.
Planting trees
Planting trees
We supply and plant trees of all shapes and sizes, directly dealing with reputable nurseries, sourcing the best quality stock at the best value, installing above and below ground anchoring and irrigation systems as well as programmed maintenance visits to give your tree the best start in life. It is important to remember that correct planting techniques cause little stress, however, poor planting techniques can cause problems throughout the tree’s lifetime.
Tree Transplanting
Tree Transplanting
We can, in certain situations, move established trees from one location to another. Often trees require removal and transplanting due to the situation they find themselves in, mainly construction and developments, or simply because the environment is no longer suitable for that tree.
02
Early Mature Trees
The stage in a trees life cycle considered to be between youth and maturity.
Tree Inspections
Tree Inspections
We provide tree inspections with reference to hazard and safety assessments, environmental impact statements in relation to trees and the care and assessment of protected, heritage and historic trees. We also provide root investigation and soil de-compaction assessments in order to treat tree health issues within an urban and suburban environment.
Tree Management
Tree Management
We provide care and management for a wide range of tree species and in a variety of environments. These include young, semi-mature, mature and veteran trees, which sometimes involves the care and management of very old trees which are significant to the environment and community. We also provide care and management for protected or heritage trees, those that are already protected by preservation orders (TPO) and those within conservation areas due to their visual and historical importance to the area or country.
By-products of tree management
By-products of tree management
We are committed to minimising its green waste and recycling. We chip as much of our green waste as possible using our fleet of brushwood chippers. This allows us to create a by-product of wood and green waste chippings which, once matured to mulch, can be used on garden beds, tree planting, compost and when dry enough as bio mass for heat production.
Any logwood and larger timber considered to be of any value which cannot be processed by our chippers is either left on site in manageable pieces or taken back to a Hi-Line yard, and used as fuel for wood burners or commercial timber use.
03
Mature Trees
Mature trees are described as being close to their full height and crown size, with main-stem diameter (which by now is large) increasing more slowly. All these dimensions are determined and affected by species and various site factors. Trees in maturity with full sized crowns have often accumulated various natural and manmade defects which may or may not be significant.
Inspections and management of mature trees
Inspections and management of mature trees
We have qualified staff that are able to assess and undertake the specific requirements of mature trees. A Visual Tree Assessment (VTA) is a method used to identify potential faults and hazards, such as a hanging broken branch, or a certain feature on a branch or main stem indicating possible internal damage, decay, or a poor branch union. Potential hazards should be identified by regular scheduled inspections on mature trees by a suitable qualified person. A Visual Tree Assessment (VTA) is designed as a quick comprehensive assessment to give an overall picture and identify where more in-depth investigation or remedial work is required.
04
Veteran Trees
A veteran tree is a unique part of our natural environment due to its great age, size or condition. They are commonly found in woodlands, historic parks and also associated with old buildings. Veteran trees can provide an important link with other ecological systems, as habitat for birds, reptiles, mammals and insects.
Veteran Tree Management
Veteran Tree Management
We provide the following veteran tree management techniques:
•Techniques for crown reducing a veteran tree e.g. veteranisation
•Halo clearance for veteran trees
•Common sense risk management of veteran trees
•Creation of decaying wood habitats
•Management of veteran pollards in a regular cycle of cutting
05
Dying or dead trees
A dying tree can be loosely described as a tree in progressive decline from its extremities towards its roots. A dead tree, also known as standing deadwood, can provide habitat, cover, and food for wildlife and insects. There are numerous habitats in both standing and fallen deadwood. As standing deadwood habitats are becoming particularly rare and threatened, it may be of value in a site such as a large garden or nature reserve to be retained as a tall stump or tree.
Tree Management
Tree Management
We provide felling and other related management options where a dead tree is to be retained. A dead tree can be removed completely or significantly reduced and a portion of the trees stem retained as standing deadwood. When deciding whether dead trees should be retained or reduced a balance should be made between managing potential risk and the maintenance of wildlife habitat. Where standing dead trees are to be retained their height can or should be reduced to mitigate any present or future risks identified. A dead tree should then be inspected periodically and further works should be undertaken, either felling or progressive reduction if necessary, to keep the risks of any potential failure within acceptable limits.
The following factors should be taken into account when retaining a dead tree:
•The location e.g. whether the dead tree is within falling distance or dead branches overhang a significant target and cannot be readily moved , such as a road or property.
•The species of tree and the decay characteristics of the tree concerned.
•The size of the dead tree and/or deadwood.

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